Cummins Engine and Reg Lenna Center for The Arts Team Up So Audiences Can Sit Down

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(L to R) Kathleen Eads, Executive Director - Reg Lenna Center for The Arts, A.J. Maze - Cummins, Phil Bosko - Cummins, Dave Willey - Cummins, Angie Peck - Cummins, Larry Crossley - Cummins, Jay Peterson, Facilities Associate - Reg Lenna Center for The Arts.          Not pictured - Ray Cartwright and Tim Phelps from Cummins
(L to R) Kathleen Eads, Executive Director – Reg Lenna Center for The Arts, A.J. Maze – Cummins, Phil Bosko – Cummins, Dave Willey – Cummins, Angie Peck – Cummins, Larry Crossley – Cummins, Jay Peterson, Facilities Associate – Reg Lenna Center for The Arts. Not pictured – Ray Cartwright and Tim Phelps from Cummins

Article Contributed by
Reg Lenna Center for The Arts

What is a theater to do when some of its vintage seats require hardware that isn’t made any more? In the case of Reg Lenna Center for The Arts (The Reg), the answer was to partner up with staff from Cummins, Inc. Jamestown Engine Plant’s Every Employee Every Community (EEEC) program to solve the problem.
Says Cummins Community Involvement Leader, Angie Peck, “EEEC promotes employee engagement by ensuring that every employee has the opportunity to volunteer four hours per calendar year to serve and improve the community.” Each project aligns with one of Cummins’ global priority areas including Education, Social Justice/Equality of Opportunity or Environment. The seat project at The Reg aligned directly with Cummins’ Core Value of “Serving and improving our Communities.” EEEC was launched by Cummins ten years ago when Business Ethics Magazine named the company “Best Corporate Citizen”.
Reg Lenna Center for The Arts’ theater is a decades old venue that requires constant upkeep. While most of the maintenance is handled using existing materials and tools, occasionally a challenge arises that requires a more creative solution. Reg Facilities Associate, Jay Peterson faced one such challenge with the seats of the auditorium. “When you manage a venue with room for 1,200 plus patrons, a seating issue stands out and needs to be addressed quickly and safely.”, he said.
Staff at Cummins met with Peterson to assess the challenge of anchoring seats to a concrete auditorium floor when aging and no longer manufactured hardware breaks. The solution required new hardware to be machined and married to existing hardware. Two more companies – Quality Manufacturing Systems and Fastenal provided resources and materials to the project.
“A project like this shows how important the needs of one group in the area – the audience – can be to the greater community.” said Reg Director of Marketing & Communications, Len Barry. He added, “That one company can call on two more to help an organization like The Reg offer the most basic need of a patron – to sit down – is tremendous.”
Newly anchored seats are available for several upcoming events at The Reg including a concert by folk group Rani Arbo & Daisy Mayhem on November 21, the return of Golden Dragon Acrobats performing Cirque Ziva on February 27 and Aquila Theatre’s production of William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet on March 11.
Visit reglenna.com or call 716.484.7070 for tickets and information. Reg Lenna Center for The Arts is located at 116 E. 3rd St. in Jamestown, NY.place and distinction…” and deserves a serious program of beautification. This and more unified signage to greet visitors will be important as Jamestown becomes an ever more popular tourist destination.
Clark Patterson Lee has been selected to conduct the study on the section of the roadway which extends between Interstate 86 and 6th Street. Clark Patterson Lee architectural associate, Joseph Rollman, said the study will begin by reviewing local zoning regulations, utilization of various areas along the route and development needs and opportunities along the way.
”North Main Street is an interesting corridor and it will offer a few challenges,” Rollman said, noting that traffic signals, crosswalks and intersection configurations may be in need of some improvement. The study will harvest public and commercial property opinions and suggestions along with detailed professional analyses to compile a final report to the public slated for March, 2016.
Clark, Patterson Lee is an interested stakeholder in this process, according to another of the firm’s architectural associates, Brian Kulpa. The company’s business address is 1279 N. Main Street. ”We’re committed as a neighbor on this corridor,” he said.
Greg Lindquist, executive director of the Jamestown Renaissance Corporation (JRC), good naturedly highlighted Clark, Patterson Lee’s location by noting the continual traffic noise that competed with the speakers’ comments on the company’s lawn.
“This is a really huge test for the Jamestown Renaissance Corporation,” Dr. Lillian Ney, JRC co-chair, told the guests at Clark Patterson Lee. She explained that JRC’s Strategic Planning Committee had come to the conclusion that the busy corridor had reached a point where improvements were clearly needed due to the wide and complex variety of uses along its route, from schools to residential neighborhoods to churches, businesses and a historic but still active cemetery. The horizon for the changes may stretch from five to 20 years before all could be completed.
Lindquist introduced the funding partners in the project as the Chautauqua Region Community Foundation, Chautauqua County Housing Trust, and Ralph C. Sheldon Foundation and North West Savings Bank.
Stakeholders and investors in this project were united in their agreement and enthusiasm for the improvements to come for this vital portal to the growing city of Jamestown, New York.