Science Fiction Author Finally Gets His Due

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(L to R): Andy Goodell (NYS Assemblyman), Mark Woolley (Pres., Bd. of Trustees, Anderson-Lee Library),Paula Klocek (A-L Library Director), Kevin Muldowney (Chaut. Co. legislator; staff, Sen. Young), Todd Johnson (Hanover Supervisor), Vince Martonis (Hanover Historian), Regina Brown (RFY granddaughter), Nick Piccolo (Silver Creek Mayor), Gary Barber (retired librarian, Reed Library).
(L to R): Andy Goodell (NYS Assemblyman), Mark Woolley (Pres., Bd. of Trustees, Anderson-Lee Library),Paula Klocek (A-L Library Director), Kevin Muldowney (Chaut. Co. legislator; staff, Sen. Young), Todd Johnson (Hanover Supervisor), Vince Martonis (Hanover Historian), Regina Brown (RFY granddaughter), Nick Piccolo (Silver Creek Mayor), Gary Barber (retired librarian, Reed Library).
(L to R): Andy Goodell (NYS Assemblyman), Mark Woolley (Pres., Bd. of Trustees, Anderson-Lee Library),Paula Klocek (A-L Library Director), Kevin Muldowney (Chaut. Co. legislator; staff, Sen. Young), Todd Johnson (Hanover Supervisor), Vince Martonis (Hanover Historian), Regina Brown (RFY granddaughter), Nick Piccolo (Silver Creek Mayor), Gary Barber (retired librarian, Reed Library).

Article Contributed by
Patricia Pihl

A little known but prolific local science fiction author has finally received recognition due to the efforts of Hanover Town Historian Vince Martonis.

Robert F. Young’s literary work, which includes 200 novels and short stories, was recently celebrated with the dedication of a historical marker in his hometown of Silver Creek. More than 75 gathered to honor the author including local dignitaries, residents and Young’s family members.

Young’s career spanned more than thirty years, and he wrote fiction until he died in 1986. Science Fiction readers credit one of his works, “The Last Yggdrasill,” as the source book for the Disney movie AVATAR.

Martonis stated, “People need to realize what a significant feather-in-the-cap this is for Chautauqua County literature and arts. How many other authors nationwide could match a literary output of over 200 novels and short stories with a total of 176 published? And that doesn’t count the ones in French, Italian and Japanese.”

The Hanover historian notes that despite his breadth of Young’s work, he remained in relative obscurity outside of the Sci-Fi community. Young was a World War II veteran employee of the Silver Creek School System as well as working in local factories.

Fifty-seven of Young’s books and magazines on display during the event, and fifteen of Young’s novels and stories were given out as raffle prizes. Reggie Brown, Young’s granddaughter, brought the typewriter that Young used to write over 200 stories, and donated it to the Hanover History Center.

The marker unveiling and ceremony was held at the Anderson-Lee Library.