Mad Max: Fury Road

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Article Contributed by
J.F. Hill

“[Narrating] My name is Max. My world is reduced to a single instinct: Survive. As the world fell it was hard to know who was more crazy: Me… Or everyone else.”
The verdict is in, and George Miller’s re-launch of the Mad Max franchise, Fury Road, is the 21st century smash hit that no audience member nor fanboy can deny. Mad Max: Fury Road is like an adrenaline shot to the chest from straight out of Pulp Fiction. It has energy, it has combustion. Mad Max: Fury Road is a brilliantly choreographed, chaotic masterpiece.
From the jump, the film takes off running. Literally, Max (Tom Hardy) is captured by a gang of War Boys, and the first of many chase sequences has him battling his way out of the catacombs of The Citadel, the oasis of his storied post-apocalyptic wasteland.
The Citadel is the home and sanctuary of Immortan Joe, a maniacal warlord with many devout followers and countless victims; one of them is his daughter, Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron), but soon, however, the tables would be turned on Immortan Joe. Furiosa has a plan, a plan of vengeance and self-redemption.
The special effects are absolutely phenomenal. The contrast of night and day is reflected beautifully in shades of teal and orange. The obstacles of the wasteland are enough to put you on your heels and just say – wow.
The only way someone could even think about sleeping in this movie is if they have narcolepsy, and I doubt it’d even be possible for them to tune out on Fury Road. It’s that captivating, it’s that enthralling, and it has all the elements of the Mad Max franchise that has kept it going for more than 35 years.
The needle has been injected, the adrenaline is pumping through his veins, its official – Mad Max is alive and well, and it’s been kicked up a notch!

Rating: 4/4 Stars

J.F. Hill: The Jamestown Gazette is pleased to bring our readers insightful and informative reviews of some of the nation’s most popular, current films. J.F. Hill’s past commentary and reviews will be archived at Jamestown Gazette’s website, www.jamestowngazette.com.